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Section 11/6 and Section 21 of the Firearms act

An 11/6 is  as follows

We have an 11/6 to cover any land we have permission to use, this is valid until 2022 in Scotland, in the rest of the U.K we are required to apply for a individual location. Normal applications can take weeks to process (in some cases it can take 16 weeks). Below is a detail of  what is required


Application for an Exemption under Section 11(6)

of the Firearms Act 1968


Clay Pigeon Shooting

Anyone wishing to hold a clay pigeon shoot where non-shotgun license holders will be firing at targets needs to apply for an exemption under Section 11(6) of the Firearms Act 1968.


The initial application for the exemption should be made at least 6 weeks before the first such event is to take place.

Please read Section 11(6) of the Firearms Act 1968 for the full details of when the law says an exemption is required.


In addition:

  • There should be a zone extending to 275 metres from the shooting point in the direction of fire

  • u may wish to consider conducting a risk assessment for the activity.

  • Shot, broken or whole clay targets should not land on any areas where the public has access, or where permission from the owner of the land has not been granted.

  • No person who appears to be under the influence of drink or drugs should be allowed possession of a gun.

  • All guns should only be loaded when on the firing point.

  • Health and Safety regulations require that appropriate safety equipment must be made available to all parties requiring it.

  • The organiser must be in a position to accept responsibility for safety at the event and should do so.

  • The organiser of such an event is advised to have an appropriate form of insurance to cover any accidents, third party liability, employers' liability etc.

  • The period of validity for the exemption may vary dependant on individual/club circumstances and specific requirements should be discussed in detail with the Firearms Licensing Unit.

 

Scotland's Outdoor Centre

Section 21 Firearms Act

SECTION 21 DISCLAIMER


It is an offence for someone who is prohibited by Section 21 of the Firearms Act 1968 to have a firearm or ammunition in his or her possession at any time.  Section 21 applies to anybody who has been sentenced to imprisonment or to youth custody or detention in a young offenders’ institution for three months or more.  The period for which they are prohibited depends on the length of their sentence, if the sentence was longer than three years the prohibition is for life.  If the sentence was three months or more but less than three years, the prohibition lasts for five years from the date of their release.  It is an offence for a person to transfer, let or hire, give or lend a firearm or ammunition to someone whom he/she knows has reasonable grounds for believing to be prohibited by Section 21.
 
 
Section 21 of the Firearms Act 1968  covers persons who are banned from being in possession of firearms or ammunition.
 
It is an offence for a shooting range operator to knowingly allow persons who are banned under section 21 from using guns at the range, whether or not there is a section 11(6) permit in operation.
 
Best practice is to identify all non-certificate holders ( by requesting sight of licence on all entrants), and any who cannot produce a certificate are asked to sign in on a form.
 
Note, that persons not in possession of a current shotgun certificate because of a revocation are not banned persons unless they have also had a custodial sentence as defined by section 21. These persons may be able to shoot legally under the provisions of section 11(6).
 
Note also, that although a person may have had an automatic ban under section 21, there is a right of appeal to the Crown Court, and on the outcome of a successful application a person can be granted a shotgun certificate. Such a person would be in possession of a normal certificate and is entitled to own shotguns.